Environment

Woman donates $800k to National Wildlife Refuges in her will

Woman donates $800k to National Wildlife Refuges in her will

Environment, Latest News
PORTLAND, Oregon - Nobody really knew Rita Poe until she died. She moved through the final years of her life with little apparent interaction with others. Few people could recall the tall, thin woman with salt-and-pepper hair and brown eyes. She died at age 66 in her home – a 27-foot travel trailer parked in the shadows of the Olympic Mountains – of colon cancer on Nov. 16, 2015. Though Rita’s life came to a close, her legacy will live on for generations thanks to her final act of astonishing generosity. With no known friends or heirs in her final years, Rita’s closest connection was Nancy Zingheim, the manager for SKP RV Park in Chimacum, Washington, where Rita had parked her Airstream during the summer of 2015. Their only encounters were when Rita would come in to pay her lot rent or
Boyan Slat To Unveil “Non-Invasive” Ocean Plastic Removal Tech In 2018

Boyan Slat To Unveil “Non-Invasive” Ocean Plastic Removal Tech In 2018

Current News, Environment, Europe, Latest News, Mainstream Headline News, News Today, Technology, Whom It May, Wildlife, World News Today
Boyan Slat went on a diving trip to Greece. He got concerned at the amount of plastic that he was surrounded by whilst he was in the water. “...I realized it was a huge issue and that environmental issues are really the biggest problems my generation will face.” Slat wanted to make sure that there was someone working on a solution. In his research, he learned that there were a few cleanup ideas out there, but most were invasive. The concept relied on using nets to filter the plastic out of the water. Those nets also scooped up a lot of fish, turtles and other sea life, and weren't practical. So he worked on developing his own solution. "I finally decided to put both university and my social life on hold to focus all my time on developing this idea. I wasn’t sure if it would succeed, b
Efficient Method of Removing Oil from Water using Magnetic Nanoparticles

Efficient Method of Removing Oil from Water using Magnetic Nanoparticles

Environment, Latest News, Science, Technology
When oil mixes with or enters into water, conventional methods of cleaning the water and removing the oil can be challenging, expensive and environmentally risky. But researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin believe they may have developed a better method. In a study published this spring of 2017 in the Journal of Nanoparticle Research, the researchers used magnetic nanoparticles to separate oil from water through a simple process that relies on electrostatic force and a magnet. The engineers believe their new technique could improve water treatment for oil and gas production, more efficiently clean up oil spills and potentially remove lead from drinking water. Today, nanoparticles, which are tiny particles that can be coated with differe...
Plants absorb more carbon when temperatures rise

Plants absorb more carbon when temperatures rise

Environment, Latest News, Science
A new understanding about how plants react to high temperatures may help improve predictions about how "climate change" will affect the planet, according to Purdue University Nick Smith, a Purdue University adjunct professor in Forestry and Natural Resources, and postdoctoral fellow at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, wanted to know how plant carbon uptake is affected by extended periods of different temperatures. The information may be helpful for models that use plant carbon uptake to estimate the effects of climate change. “Models have good representations of short-term changes in temperature, but few data exist for incorporating longer-term responses,” said Smith, whose research was part of his doctoral work under Purdue Professor Jeffrey Dukes. “Plants are currently the on
Los Angeles Lawns Lose Lots of Water: 70 Billion of Gallons A Year

Los Angeles Lawns Lose Lots of Water: 70 Billion of Gallons A Year

Environment, Latest News, USA
City’s rich and famous lose twice as much as poor; but trees are relatively efficient. In summer 2010, Los Angeles was losing about 100 gallons of water per person per day to the atmosphere through the evaporation and plant uptake of lawns and trees. Lawns accounted for 70 percent of the water loss, while trees accounted for 30 percent, according to a University of Utah study published in Water Resources Research. The results, based on measurements taken before Los Angeles enacted mandatory watering restrictions in 2014, shows a pattern of systemic overwatering in the city's lawns, and a surprising water efficiency in tree cover. Further, the researchers found a correlation between water loss and household income. "The soil was so moist that
Gas prices expected to remain low this summer, Economist says

Gas prices expected to remain low this summer, Economist says

Economy, Environment, Latest News
With Memorial Day and the start of the summer driving season, Purdue University energy economist Wally Tyner believes reduced demand and higher inventories will help keep the brakes on oil prices. “This week, OPEC agreed to extend their production cuts through March of 2018,” said Tyner, James & Lois Ackerman professor of Agricultural Economics. “However, all their production cuts have done so far is keep crude oil prices from falling. The big reason the cuts have had little impact on crude oil prices is that U.S. shale oil production has been growing rapidly. In fact, US shale oil production has grown 600,000 barrels per day since the OPEC cuts were first announced.” By the end of this year, it is likely that U.S. shale oil production will have grown 1.2 million barrels per day,

Preparing the Nation for Intense Space Weather

Environment, Latest News, Space
While major geomagnetic storms are rare, with only a few recorded per century, there is significant potential for large-scale impacts when they do occur. Extreme space weather can be viewed as hazards for the economy and national security. The entire Canadian province of Québec, which covers twice as much area as the State of Texas, was plunged into darkness on the morning of March 13, 1989. An intense geomagnetic storm seized Québec’s power-grid system, tripping relays, damaging high-voltage transformers, and causing a blackout. This geomagnetic storm’s impact on Québec pales in comparison to what could happen in the future. A report by the National Academy of Sciences suggests that a rare but powerful magnetic superstorm could cause continent-wide loss of el
Japan-led research group preparing to drill down to the mantle

Japan-led research group preparing to drill down to the mantle

Asia, Environment, International News, Latest News
Aiming for the world’s first-ever direct excavation of the Earth’s mantle An international research group led by the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) will conduct a preliminary study in the waters off Hawaii in September, The Yomiuri Shimbun learned Tuesday. The area is considered to be a leading candidate site for the drilling. The research group, including researchers from Japan, the United States and the Europe, plans to intensively investigate the underground structure of the area to find a suitable spot for drilling. JAMSTEC and its partners aim to realize the excavation of the mantle in the early 2020s — at the earliest — using Japan’s deep-sea scientific drilling vessel Chikyu. The mantle is located beneath the crust, which covers the surf