Health

Get the latest health news and explore information on fitness, diet, nutrition, medicine, diseases and healthy living.

UGA Using Robots, Drones To Increase GMO Food Production

UGA Using Robots, Drones To Increase GMO Food Production

Breaking News, Current News, Environment, Food, Health, Latest News, News Headlines, News Today, Science, Technology, USA, Whom It May
These researchers suggest humans have 30 years to double our food supply, and a local university said robots will help get the job done. Engineers at the University of Georgia have developed robots and software that will monitor crops to gather information for geneticists to help increase food and fiber production. “Arable land that is in production worldwide is a finite resource,” Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black said. According to WSB-TV's report, Black suggested growers must be more productive with the farm land they already have. Black also believes, crops can be genetically developed to increase yields, resistance to pests and to withstand droughts and high temperatures. “We’re very certain we’ve got to increase this food and fiber production somewhere between 7
UN Votes to Prohibit Nuclear Weapons – Treaty Awaits Ratification

UN Votes to Prohibit Nuclear Weapons – Treaty Awaits Ratification

Breaking News, Current News, Environment, Government, Health, International News, Latest News, Mainstream Headline News, News Headlines, News Today, World News Today
United Nations Conference Vote to Prohibit Nuclear Weapons, Leading Towards their Total Elimination Background information By resolution 71/258, the General Assembly decided to convene in 2017 a United Nations conference to negotiate a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination. The Assembly encouraged all Member States to participate in the Conference and decided that it shall convene in New York, under the rules of procedure of the General Assembly unless otherwise agreed by the Conference, with the participation and contribution of international organizations and civil society representatives. The Conference will be held in New York from 27 to 31 March and from 15 June to 7 July. The Conference held a one-day organizational session 
Concerns Being Raised on Air Pollution Despite Levels Currently Accepted As ‘Safe’

Concerns Being Raised on Air Pollution Despite Levels Currently Accepted As ‘Safe’

Environment, Health, Latest News, USA
The Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) warns that government agencies must not become complacent in the effort to provide clean air to all citizens. Despite the advancements that have been made since the 1963 introduction of the Clean Air Act in the United States, much more remains to be done. The most recent example of this is a report published on June 29, 2017, in the New England Journal of Medicine, that was looking at 12 years of Medicare beneficiary data, which showed the risk of death increased in proportion to the amount of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere. Most concerning was the finding that, although the current National Ambient Air Quality Standards declare that 12 micrograms per cubic meter of fine, inhalable particles (those with an aerodynamic di
South Florida judge rules to keep some 9/11 records secret

South Florida judge rules to keep some 9/11 records secret

Current News, Government, Health, Latest News, Mainstream Headline News, News Headlines, Plane, Police, USA, World News Today
A U.S. District Court judge has determined that the FBI is not improperly withholding information about who funded the 9/11 attacks and also decided that there would be no Freedom of Information Act trial to evaluate the need for keeping some information related to the attacks under wraps. Judge Cecilia Altonaga’s ruling was part of a case brought by Florida Bulldog, a South Florida journalism organization, that for years has probed connections between the hijackers and some Saudis living at the time in the United States. The organization has been supported in its efforts by former U.S. Sen. Bob Graham, who co-chaired Congress’s Joint Inquiry into 9/11, and by the Herald-Tribune, as a so-called “friend of the court.” A Freedom of Information Act trial, in which the government would h
US Nuclear Plant’s Computer System Hacked

US Nuclear Plant’s Computer System Hacked

Breaking News, Current News, Cyber Activities, Environment, Government, Health, International News, Latest News, News Headlines, News Today, Science, Technology, USA, Whom It May
At least one U.S. nuclear power plant was breached and is now being investigated by Federal authorities. However, evidence of particularly sensitive or operational systems being breached were found.  Authorities believe that the breach was aimed at information of the "business-associated side". There was at least one breach detected over recent months. The breach was first reported by E&E News, which covers energy and environment business and policy issues. E&E noted the hack did not garner the attention of the public safety alert systems at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission or the International Atomic Energy Agency, which could be further evidence of a low risk level associated with the breach. A U.S. official called it an "ongoing matter", meaning, it is still bein
Smartphones: Cognitive Capacity Significantly Reduced Caused by Addiction And Radio Frequency Radiation

Smartphones: Cognitive Capacity Significantly Reduced Caused by Addiction And Radio Frequency Radiation

Health, Latest News, Science, Technology
The Mere Presence of Your Smartphone Reduces Brain Power Your cognitive capacity is significantly reduced when your smartphone is within reach -- even if it's off. That's the takeaway finding from a new study from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin. McCombs Assistant Professor Adrian Ward and co-authors conducted experiments with nearly 800 smartphone users in an attempt to measure, for the first time, how well people can complete tasks when they have their smartphones nearby even when they're not using them. In one experiment, the researchers asked study participants to sit at a computer and take a series of tests that required full concentration in order to score well. The tests were geared to measure participants' available cognitive capacity -- t...
Victims from the Grenfill Tower fire recieve just £10 ($13) for food and drink.

Victims from the Grenfill Tower fire recieve just £10 ($13) for food and drink.

Current News, Europe, Food, Government, Health, International News, Latest News, Mainstream Headline News, News Headlines, News Today, UK, World News Today
Council is giving survivors £10 when they go to hotels but no access to £millions donated by public?   Shocking: Volunteer Nisha Parti says victims of #GrenfellTower fire have no access to donated funds and are being given 'a tenner'. #Peston pic.twitter.com/FXy1Er0Qkk — EL4C (@EL4JC) June 18, 2017 .@sarahwollaston and @DavidLammy agree the official relief effort for survivors of the #GrenfellTower fire has been unacceptable. #Peston pic.twitter.com/SLwikp4a58 — Peston on Sunday (@pestononsunday) June 18, 2017 Jeremy Corbyn: "Every day, hundreds of people are stranded at airports and they are found hotels straight away". #Peston. pic.twitter.com/92zvHWuSvA — EL4C (@EL4JC) June 18, 2017
Death by caffeine? Dangers of caffeine dissected after teen’s death

Death by caffeine? Dangers of caffeine dissected after teen’s death

Health, Latest News
Death by caffeine: an eye-catching headline when a coroner recently declared a South Carolina teen died from excessive caffeine consumption. In the span of two hours, according to reports, the 16 year-old drank a large Diet Mountain Dew, a cafe latte from McDonald’s and an energy drink, causing a “caffeine-induced cardiac event” leading to a probable arrhythmia. The news surprised many experts in the medical community, including Joseph Garry, M.D., associate professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Minnesota Medical School. “Deaths from caffeine ingestion are actually quite rare,” Garry explained. “However, this is entirely preventable and as such, any preventable death is tragic.” While several studies have tried to find a link betw
E-cigarettes less addictive than cigarettes, PATH study shows

E-cigarettes less addictive than cigarettes, PATH study shows

Drugs, Health, Latest News
People who regularly use electronic cigarettes are less dependent on their product than those who regularly use traditional cigarettes, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. While cigarette use has declined in recent years in the United States, the use of e-cigarettes is increasing, especially among adolescents and young adults. Although the new findings suggest that electronic cigarettes — also known as e-cigarettes — cause less nicotine dependence than traditional cigarettes, planned follow-up studies will help determine if e-cigarettes could lead to traditional cigarettes dependence in the future. E-cigarettes include a range of battery-powered devices that heat and vaporize a liquid mixture — e-liquid — that may contain nicotine, flavorings and other chemicals.
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Gave Drugs “Accelerated Approval” Without Proper Evaluations

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Gave Drugs “Accelerated Approval” Without Proper Evaluations

Drugs, Health, Latest News, USA
A new study published on the 6th of June, 2017 has exposed major flaws in the fast tracking of some drugs available to the American public without any stringent clinical evidence of their benefits. Researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and the United States say that many US patients with serious illnesses are being treated by drugs which have questionable data. The findings, published in The Milbank Quarterly, relate to drugs given "accelerated approval" by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) without any strong clinical evaluation. The study assessed 37 new drugs given accelerated approval by the FDA between 2000 and 2013. Drugs eligible for accelerated approval are assessed as "reasonably likely" to provide clinical benefits but the...