Science

Coming Soon! A United States Space Corps.

Coming Soon! A United States Space Corps.

Current News, Latest News, Mainstream Headline News, Military, News Headlines, Russia, Science, Space, Technology, United States Air Force, USA, Whom It May
Last weekend, an NPR radio personality sat down with Republican Rep. Mike Rogers of Alabama about a bipartisan bill that would create a new part of the military for space operations, called Space Corps. Then Wednesday, The house armed services committee voted to moving forward with the creation of a Space Corps.  Overall, they voted against an amendment that had been forwarded by Rep. Mike Turner, a republican from Ohio. "This mark is asking us to do something we have not done since 1947", said Mike Turner Mike says that he mostly concerned that we haven't risen to the level of knowledge for us to make this kind of decision. The new branch of the Military would be housed by the Air Force, but leaders of the National Air Force are concerned that this will create unneeded bureauc
1 billion suns: World’s brightest laser sparks new behavior in light

1 billion suns: World’s brightest laser sparks new behavior in light

Latest News, Science
Physicists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln are seeing an everyday phenomenon in a new light. By focusing laser light to a brightness 1 billion times greater than the surface of the sun — the brightest light ever produced on Earth — the physicists have observed changes in a vision-enabling interaction between light and matter. Those changes yielded unique X-ray pulses with the potential to generate extremely high-resolution imagery useful for medical, engineering, scientific and security purposes. The team’s findings, detailed June 26 in the journal Nature Photonics, should also help inform future experiments involving high-intensity lasers. Donald Umstadter and colleagues at the university’s Extreme Light Laboratory fired their Diocles Laser at a beam of electrons to measu
US Nuclear Plant’s Computer System Hacked

US Nuclear Plant’s Computer System Hacked

Breaking News, Current News, Cyber Activities, Environment, Government, Health, International News, Latest News, News Headlines, News Today, Science, Technology, USA, Whom It May
At least one U.S. nuclear power plant was breached and is now being investigated by Federal authorities. However, evidence of particularly sensitive or operational systems being breached were found.  Authorities believe that the breach was aimed at information of the "business-associated side". There was at least one breach detected over recent months. The breach was first reported by E&E News, which covers energy and environment business and policy issues. E&E noted the hack did not garner the attention of the public safety alert systems at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission or the International Atomic Energy Agency, which could be further evidence of a low risk level associated with the breach. A U.S. official called it an "ongoing matter", meaning, it is still bein
Discovery of 5,000-Year-Old ‘Billboard’ Containing A Cosmic Message

Discovery of 5,000-Year-Old ‘Billboard’ Containing A Cosmic Message

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Near the Egyptian village of El-Khawy, archaeologists have discovered the oldest billboard known to man. The very large hieroglyphs give scientist an idea of how they invented their unique writing system. The Egyptian antiquities ministry announced the discovery on June 22nd. The team from Yale, that made the disovery, found another carving shoowing a herd of elephants, created sometime between 4000 B.C. and 3500 B.C.  One of the elephants in the image is a depicted to be pregnant with a calf. Another had a more political image which showed a Bulls head at the end of staff, which in the time period and region would have symbolized the royal power. The, "inscription was visible to travelers going to and from the early city of Elkab." said John Darnell This unlike our m
Smartphones: Cognitive Capacity Significantly Reduced Caused by Addiction And Radio Frequency Radiation

Smartphones: Cognitive Capacity Significantly Reduced Caused by Addiction And Radio Frequency Radiation

Health, Latest News, Science, Technology
The Mere Presence of Your Smartphone Reduces Brain Power Your cognitive capacity is significantly reduced when your smartphone is within reach -- even if it's off. That's the takeaway finding from a new study from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin. McCombs Assistant Professor Adrian Ward and co-authors conducted experiments with nearly 800 smartphone users in an attempt to measure, for the first time, how well people can complete tasks when they have their smartphones nearby even when they're not using them. In one experiment, the researchers asked study participants to sit at a computer and take a series of tests that required full concentration in order to score well. The tests were geared to measure participants' available cognitive capacity -- t...
Your Eyes Can Tell a Lot About Yourself Even Without Saying a Word

Your Eyes Can Tell a Lot About Yourself Even Without Saying a Word

Latest News, Science, Strange
What eye pupils tells us about language The meaning of a word is enough to trigger a reaction in our pupil: when we read or hear a word with a meaning associated with luminosity ("sun," "shine," etc.), our pupils contract as they would if they were actually exposed to greater luminosity. And the opposite occurs with a word associated with darkness ("night," "gloom," etc.). These results, published on 14 June 2017 in Psychological Science by researchers from the Laboratoire de psychologie cognitive (CNRS/AMU), the Laboratoire parole et langage (CNRS/AMU) and the University of Groningen (Netherlands), open up a new avenue for better understanding how our brain processes language. The researchers demonstrate here that the size of the pupils does not depend simply on the luminosity of t...
Efficient Method of Removing Oil from Water using Magnetic Nanoparticles

Efficient Method of Removing Oil from Water using Magnetic Nanoparticles

Environment, Latest News, Science, Technology
When oil mixes with or enters into water, conventional methods of cleaning the water and removing the oil can be challenging, expensive and environmentally risky. But researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin believe they may have developed a better method. In a study published this spring of 2017 in the Journal of Nanoparticle Research, the researchers used magnetic nanoparticles to separate oil from water through a simple process that relies on electrostatic force and a magnet. The engineers believe their new technique could improve water treatment for oil and gas production, more efficiently clean up oil spills and potentially remove lead from drinking water. Today, nanoparticles, which are tiny particles that can be coated with differe...
Human Doctor Obsoletion: Medical Artificial Intelligence Predicts Patient Lifespans

Human Doctor Obsoletion: Medical Artificial Intelligence Predicts Patient Lifespans

Health, Latest News, Science, Technology
A computer's ability to predict a patient's lifespan simply by looking at images of their organs is a step closer to becoming a reality, thanks to new research led by the University of Adelaide. The research, now published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports, has implications for the early diagnosis of serious illness, and medical intervention. Researchers from the University's School of Public Health and School of Computer Science, along with Australian and international collaborators, used artificial intelligence to analyse the medical imaging of 48 patients' chests. This computer-based analysis was able to predict which patients would die within five years, with 69% accuracy -- comparable to 'manual' predictions by clinicians. This is the first study of its kind using medi...
Reports of Snake Bites On The Rise In The South

Reports of Snake Bites On The Rise In The South

Latest News, Science, USA, Whom It May, Wildlife
The Georgia Poison Control Center has seen 55 snake bites so far this year. In 2016, there were more than 500 snakebite calls. The center said the earliest snakebite on record in 2017 happened in the first few days of the year. Mitchell Jeffords, a native to Athens, Georgia, considers himself lucky despite spending three days in the hospital after a copperhead strike near a local lake. “It swelled up to almost foot long circumference,” Jefford said alluding to the area around the snake bite. Doctors monitored his swelling to see if he would need antivenin which patients receive after a snake digs its fangs into your skin. Doctors say Jeffords never needed it. “They give me fluids for dehydration (and) blood thinner; took (my) blood pressure; kept (an) eye on me,” Jefford
Plants absorb more carbon when temperatures rise

Plants absorb more carbon when temperatures rise

Environment, Latest News, Science
A new understanding about how plants react to high temperatures may help improve predictions about how "climate change" will affect the planet, according to Purdue University Nick Smith, a Purdue University adjunct professor in Forestry and Natural Resources, and postdoctoral fellow at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, wanted to know how plant carbon uptake is affected by extended periods of different temperatures. The information may be helpful for models that use plant carbon uptake to estimate the effects of climate change. “Models have good representations of short-term changes in temperature, but few data exist for incorporating longer-term responses,” said Smith, whose research was part of his doctoral work under Purdue Professor Jeffrey Dukes. “Plants are currently the on