Wildlife

Boyan Slat To Unveil “Non-Invasive” Ocean Plastic Removal Tech In 2018

Boyan Slat To Unveil “Non-Invasive” Ocean Plastic Removal Tech In 2018

Current News, Environment, Europe, Latest News, Mainstream Headline News, News Today, Technology, Whom It May, Wildlife, World News Today
Boyan Slat went on a diving trip to Greece. He got concerned at the amount of plastic that he was surrounded by whilst he was in the water. “...I realized it was a huge issue and that environmental issues are really the biggest problems my generation will face.” Slat wanted to make sure that there was someone working on a solution. In his research, he learned that there were a few cleanup ideas out there, but most were invasive. The concept relied on using nets to filter the plastic out of the water. Those nets also scooped up a lot of fish, turtles and other sea life, and weren't practical. So he worked on developing his own solution. "I finally decided to put both university and my social life on hold to focus all my time on developing this idea. I wasn’t sure if it would succeed, b
Reports of Snake Bites On The Rise In The South

Reports of Snake Bites On The Rise In The South

Latest News, Science, USA, Whom It May, Wildlife
The Georgia Poison Control Center has seen 55 snake bites so far this year. In 2016, there were more than 500 snakebite calls. The center said the earliest snakebite on record in 2017 happened in the first few days of the year. Mitchell Jeffords, a native to Athens, Georgia, considers himself lucky despite spending three days in the hospital after a copperhead strike near a local lake. “It swelled up to almost foot long circumference,” Jefford said alluding to the area around the snake bite. Doctors monitored his swelling to see if he would need antivenin which patients receive after a snake digs its fangs into your skin. Doctors say Jeffords never needed it. “They give me fluids for dehydration (and) blood thinner; took (my) blood pressure; kept (an) eye on me,” Jefford
Boom times for fish populations in Wisconsin lakes

Boom times for fish populations in Wisconsin lakes

Latest News, Wildlife
We're all familiar with the idea of extreme events. Meteorologists keep us up to date on hurricanes, floods and high temperatures. Economists watch the stock market for signs of crashes or rallies. Researchers spend a lot of time trying to better predict these events, yet are often surprised by the outcomes. According to a new study in the journal Limnology & Oceanography Letters, when it comes to nature's extremes, nothing seems to beat what happens underwater. Scientists at the National Science Foundation (NSF) North Temperate Lakes Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site -- one of 28 NSF LTER sites -- are routinely measuring everything from water temperature to nutrient concentrations to fish populations in Wisconsin lakes. Taking advantage of several decades' worth of da...
Manatee Reclassified from Endangered to Threatened

Manatee Reclassified from Endangered to Threatened

Environment, Latest News, Wildlife
On the heels of Manatee Appreciation Day, the U.S. Department of the Interior announced the downlisting of the West Indian manatee from endangered to threatened. Notable increases in manatee populations and improvements in its habitat allowed the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to change the species’ status under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The downlisting comes after diverse conservation efforts and collaborations by Florida and other manatee states, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Caribbean nations, public and private organizations and citizens. There have been notable increases in manatee populations and improvements in its habitat. “The Fish and Wildlife Service has worked hand in hand with state and local governments, businesses, industry, and countless stakeholders
14-Year-Old Boy And His Dog Hit With U.S. Wildlife Services Planted “Cyanide Bomb”

14-Year-Old Boy And His Dog Hit With U.S. Wildlife Services Planted “Cyanide Bomb”

Environment, Government, Latest News, Wildlife
Federally funded and planted cyanide bomb injures boy and kills his pet dog. SALMON, Idaho (INTELLIHUB) Canyon Mansfield, 14, and his Labrador retriever named Casey were playing outside on Thursday when he saw what looked like a sprinkler head sticking up out of the ground which detonated just seconds later when he touched it, injuring the boy and killing his dog. The boy’s mother Theresa Mansfield said the explosion of deadly cyanide gas hit both her son and their pet. “Canyon said there was a bang like a bomb, then an explosion of an orange substance that covered him and Casey, who was writhing in pain on the ground before he died right in front of Canyon,” Mansfield said. According to Reuters: The device, called an M-44, was among several placed in the area by Wildlife Se